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As promised in the last week’s Saturday dev frame, here is a post about creating a simple map location using our in-game map editor. Its purpose is to show how easy it is to use, although there might be posts about more complex maps in the future.

 

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First of all, keep in mind that I’m not an actual level designer. I’m just using the map editor in order to show you how it works and how easy it is to use even without any prior experience with it (that’s literally my first map).

 

There are a couple or pre-made detailed terrains currently available in the map editor, and the one I used is Ozin’s mountains map he’s been working on back in September. It’s possible to alter a terrain directly in the editor, although it’s an incredibly lengthy task if your goal is to create a whole map, thus I’ve decided to focus on simpler mapping and stick to props’ placement.

 

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The idea behind a location was to make some sort of a bandits’ camp with stolen goods in the middle of a forest, so I started with a small hut for bandits to sleep in after a tiresome day of banditry. To add props you just drag and drop them from the list, and then you can move them around, rotate, and scale.

 

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After placing a house, the next thing bandits require would be a place to keep their goods safe during a rainy day. Luckily, the editor provides easy tools for putting props exactly where you want them to be. A couple of anvils, few crates and barrels, a pricey looking cross, and the company became rich in no time.

 

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To continue my work on this lovely hideout, I wanted to have a better realization of how a forest would affect it. You don’t have to place every plant and tree manually, ┬áthere is a tool called PropPaint designed specifically for that job. You’re free to select a radius of a “brush”, a density, and a set of props you want to place.

 

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I’ve picture the location to be set in a pine or a spruce woods, making my tree of a choice quite obvious. At first, I used a small radius not to place too many trees directly at the hideout location, but then I switched to a bigger radius to paint a distant forest.

 

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After the trees were all placed and a few of them manually removed to add a little bit of space, it was time to add some nice details to the bandits’ camp. I’ve added a cart with more stolen goods, a number of weapons lying here and there, and little more tiny props for more lively look, yet I had a couple of more ideas.

 

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Every map needs a good backstory for it to be believable, therefore I’ve added more interesting props to the almost finished hideout. Here you can see a cart with a broken wheel standing near the hut and a stand with carpenter’s tools that will be used to fix it.

 

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A finishing touch included a few more assets like boulders, smaller stones, a few more trees to close the gaps, and plants to make the ground more covered.

 

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